A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered by the blog author, Jim Jackson, with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Belgium

1851-54 Scott 6 & 7 10c brown & 20c blue
King Leopold I
Quick History
Belgium , in western Europe along the North Sea, has traditionally been considered part of the Low Counties along with the Netherlands and Luxembourg. However Belgium seceded from the Netherlands  in 1830 and Prince Leopold became King of the Kingdom of Belgium with the capital in Brussels. This Constitutional Monarchy form of government continues in this country of 8 million (1941census), consisting of half Dutch speakers (Flemish), and half French speakers (Walloons). King Leopold I was on Belgium's first stamps issued in 1849.

Trivia: French Fries originated in Belgium.

1896 Scott 79 5c deep violet
Brussels Exhibition Issue: "St. Michael and Satan"
Big Blue Picture
Big Blue (1997) on 24 pages ( not including blank pages) has 549 stamp spaces. The 2011 Scott Classic Specialized catalogue has 971 major stamp descriptions for regular, semi-postal, air post, special delivery, postage due, official, newspaper, occupation, and parcel post (railroad) stamps.
Big Blue(1997) has 57% coverage.

Big Blue has a large selection of the 1910-1940 Belgium semi-postals on eight pages with 179 stamp spaces!  The semi-postals are quite attractive, and many are inexpensive, BUT some are not. Look at this set...

(1933) Restoration of Orval Abbey
B132 ($57+), B133,B135,B136,B134 ($52+ except noted)
Note: Four $52+ stamps and a $57+ stamp! Counterfeits exist.

Yes it will cost $263+ retail for this set.

Overall, I rate Big Blue's coverage of Belgium "good". But BB has an annoying trait of dropping a series too early with cheap stamps on the table. This was especially noticeable with the Parcel Post (Railroad) stamps. Also, Belgium's surcharged stamps seem to have a harder time making it into Big Blue. ( I've noticed this "surcharge shortage" with other countries too.)

Why not a rating better than "good"? Because I found 200 stamps that one could argue should be in Big Blue. Way too many to discuss in depth, but I present the list below.

Additional stamps to consider...

Classic issues
1865 Scott 13 1c green ($20+)
1867 Scott 20 or 20a 30c brown ($10++)
1867 Scott 21 or 21a 40c rose ($20+)

1866-67 Coat of arms issue Note: Not included at all by BB
Scott 24 or 24a 1c gray($10+)

1869-78
36 1 fr dull lilac($10+)
38 50c gray($10+)

1883
47 25c blue($30+)
48 50c violet($30+)

1884-91
54 1 fr brown/greenish($10+)
57 25c violet brown ($2+)

1893-1900
72($20+)
75($10++)

As I mentioned, I found 200 stamps that could be considered for addition. This includes 35 regular issues, 31 semi-postals,17 postage dues, 29 newspaper stamps and 79 parcel post (railroad) stamps.

Twentieth century additions
(Scott 129,130,131,132,133,157,164,166,169,170,194,210,211,212,228,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,182,183,232,233,234,235,240,241,254,255,256,C6,C7,J1,J2,J11,J12,J15,J17,J18,J19,J20,J21,J33,J34, B11,B12,B15,B16,B17,B19,B20,B21,B22,B23,B24,B58,B72,B73,B222,B223,B250,B251,B252,B253,B264,B269,B270,B271,B272,B273,B274,B275,B276,B277,B278,J35,J36,J37,J38,J39,Q5,Q6,Q13,Q14,N5,N6,N7,N21,N22,N23,E6,P8,P10,P11,P12,P13,P14,P15,P16,P17,P18,P20,P21,P22,P23,P24,P25,P26,P27,P28,P29,P30,P32,P33,P34,P35,P36,P37,P38,P39,Q7,Q11,Q12,Q13,Q14,Q67,Q69,Q71,Q72,Q73,Q77,Q78,Q79, Q80,Q83,Q91,Q92,Q95,Q97,Q99,Q100,Q101,Q102,Q107,Q108,Q109,Q110,Q111,Q112,Q113,Q114,Q116,Q118,Q119,Q120,Q121,Q122,Q123,Q124,Q125,Q126,Q127,Q130,Q131,Q137,Q138,Q174,Q175,Q197,Q198,Q199,Q200,Q201,Q202,Q203,Q204,Q205,Q206,Q215 and 1940 issued Q216-Q236.) (<$1 to a few in the $10 range- remember this includes semi-postals.)

1914 B28 5c green & red
Red Cross semi-postal: "Merode Monument"
An "O" rather than a "Q" in "Belgique": Forgery!
Big Blue checklist
1850-63 King Leopold I
10c brown -Scott 3 Imperf ($190+) or 6 Imperf ($5+) or 10 Imperf ($5+) or 14($2+)
20c blue - Scott 4 Imperf ($60+) or 7 Imperf ($5+) or 11 Imperf ($5+) or 15($2+)
40c carmine rose-Scott 5 Imperf ($500+) or 12 Imperf ($80+) or 16 ($20+); or 16d vermilion ($30+) or 16f bright vermilion ($40+)
Note: Either Imperf or Perf can be put in these spaces.
Note: Consult Scott for the additional minor numbers based on paper thickness, perforations, or stamp height.

1866 King Leopold
18 or 18a ($2+)
19 blue  or 19b blue  or 19c Prussian blue ($2+-$5+) Note: BB specifies "blue"

1869-78
28,29,30,32,33,37, (<$1-$1+)
34,35, ($2+-$5+)
Note: 40,41,42,43,44(<$1-$2+) are either "wrong" colors and/or "wrong" year (1881).

1883
45,46,($2+-$5+)

1884-91
49,50,55,51,52,56,53,58 (<$1-$2+)

1893-1900
60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67 20c olive green*,68,69 (<$1-$2+)
70 50c bister ($20+)
71,73 ($2+)
* Note: "olive green" in catalogue is "reseda" in BB.

1894
76,77,78 ($2+-$1+)

1896 Brussels exhibition issue
79,80($2+),81 (<$1 except noted)

1905-07
82,83,($5+),84,85,86,87,88,89(<$1 except noted)

1912-13
92,93,94,95,96,97,99,(<$1)
100($2+)
103,104,105,107,(<$1)

1915-21 perf 14
108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118, (<$1)
119,120 ($1+-$2+)
Note: 116-120(<$1-$5+) with minor numbers  perf 15 available.

1919
123(<$1)

1919 King Albert in Trench Helmet
124,125, (<$1)

1920 King Albert in Trench Helmet
126,127,128 (<$1)

1920
139(<$1)

1921 semi-postals surcharged
140,141,142,143 (<$1)

1921-23
144,146 3c fawn (<$1) Note: "fawn" in catalogue is "terra cotta" in BB.
147,148,149,150,151,152,154,156, (<$1)
162,163,165,167, (<$1)

1926-28
145,153,155,158,185,186,187,159 (<$1)
160,161,188,(<$1)
189($1+)

1927 surcharged
191,192,193 (<$1)

1929-30
195,196,197 (<$1)

(1929-30)
198,199,200,201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209, (<$1)

1930
218,219,220, (<$1-$1+)

1932 Balloon
251,252 (<$1-$2+)
253 ($11+)

1930
216,217 (<$1)

1931
227,229,230,231,(<$1)

1932 Gleaner, Mercury
245,246,247,248,249,250,(<$1)

1934 King Albert memorial issue
257(<$1)

1934
258,259,260,261, (<$1)

1934-35 King Leopold III
262,263 (<$1)

1935 King Leopold III
264 (<$1)

1936-38
265,266,267,268 dark violet (<$1) Note: "dark violet" in catalogue is "indigo" in BB.
269,270,271,272,273,274,275,(<$1)
284 1F rose carmine King Leopold III (<$1)

1936-40 King Leopold III
294,295,296,298,299 (<$1)
301,302,303 (<$1)

1937
309,310(<$1)

1938
317(<$1)

1938
318,319,320,321 (<$1)

Semi-Postal stamps
1910
B1,B2,B3,B4,B5,B6,B7,B8 ($1+-$5+)

1914
B28,B25,B26,B27($40+),B29 ($1+-$5+ except noted)

1915
B31,B32,B33 ($3-$10+)

1918
B34,B35,B36,B37,B38, B39,B40, (<$1-$5+)

1920
B48,B49,B50 ($1+-$2+)

1925
B53,B54,B55 (<$1-$1+)

1922-1923-1926
B51,B52,B56 (<$1-$2+)

1926
B62,B59,B60,B61,B63($5+), (<$1 except noted)

1927
B64,B65,B66,B67,B68 (<$1-$4+)

1928
B69,B70,B71,B72, (<$1-$1+)
B74($21) Note: B73($2+) was not used; instead  B74

1928-31
B78,B79,B80,B81, B82($10+),B94, (<$1 except noted)
B93,B95,B96,B97 (<$1-$5+)

1930
B99,B100,B101,B102 (<$1)
B103,B104 ($5+-$2+)

1931
B107,B108,B109,B110,B111($5+),B112($2+), (<$1-$1+ eN)

1932
B114,B115,B116 (<$1-$2+)

(1933) Restoration of Orval Abbey
B132 ($57+), B133,B135,B136,B134 ($52+ except noted)
Note: Four $52+ stamps and a $57+ stamp! Counterfeits exist.

B125,B126,B127,B128 (<$1-$1)

1933
B144,B145,B146 ($1+-$2+)
B147($10+)

1934
B151 ($5+)

1934
B156,B157,B158,B159 ($1-$2+)

1935
B163,B164,B165 (<$1-$2+)

1935
B166,B167,B168 (<$1-$2+)

(1935)
B170,B171,B172,B173 (<$1)
B174,B175,B176,B177 (<$1-$2+)

1936
B180,B181,B182,B183 (<$1)
B184,B185,B186,B187,B188 (<$1-$2+)

1937
B189,B190,B191,B192, (<$1-$1+)
B193,B194,B195,B196, (<$1-$5+)

(1937)
B200,B201,B202,B203 (<$1)
B204,B205,B206,B207 (<$1-$5+)

(1937)
B197,B198 (<$1)

1938
B209,B210,B211,B212,B213 (<$1-$2+)

(1938)
B225,B226,B227,B228,(<$1)
B229,B230,B231,B232, (<$1-$10+)

1938
B214,B215,B216,B217,(<$1)
B218,B220($11+),B219,(<$1 except noted)

1939
B233,B234,B235,B237,B239, (<$1-$1+)
B236,B238, (<$1)
B240($6+)

1939
B244,B245,B246,B247($15),B242, (<$1-$4+ except noted)
B241,B248($19),B243, (<$1 except noted)

1939
B249,B252,B253,B250,B251($2+)
Note: These semi-postals are NOT in the '69 or '97 edition; only the '47 and '41 editions.


1940
B256,B257,B258,B259, (<$1)
B260,B261,B262,B263, ($1+-$10+)
B265,B266,B267,B268 (<$1)

Air Post stamps
1930
C1,C2,C3,C4 (<$1)

Special Delivery stamps
1929
E1,E2, (<$1)
E3,E4, ($5+)

1931
E5($2+)

Postage Due
1895-1915
J3 (<$1)
Five blank spaces: suggest J4,J5,J6,J7,J8 or J9 (<$1-$5)
Note: 1916 issue "not eligible"

1922-32
J22(<$1)
Ten blank spaces: suggest J23,J24,J25,J26,J27,J28,J29,J30,J31,J32 (<$1)

Official stamps
1929-38 overprinted
Sixteen blank spaces: suggest 20 stamp choices O1,O2,O3,O4,O7,O8,O9,O10,O11,O12,O16,O17,O18,O19,O20,O21,O22,O23,O24,O25 (<$1)

Newspaper stamps
1928-29 Parcel post stamps of 1923-27 overprinted "Journaux Dagbladen 1928"
P1,P2,P3,P4,P5,P6 (<$1)
P7 ($2+)
Note: 1929-31 series is ruled out for inclusion, as illustrated overprint is not the same; therefore Big Blue does not provide room for the 1929-31 series.

Parcel Post (Railroad) stamps
1895-98
Q16,Q18,Q19,Q20 (<$1-$1+)
Q21,Q22,Q23, ($1-$2+)
Q24($15)

1902
Q25,Q26,Q27,Q28 ($1+)

1902-06
Q29,Q30,Q31,Q32 (<$1)
Q33,Q35,Q36,Q38,(<$1)
Q39,Q40,Q41 (<$1)
Q42,Q43,Q44,Q45 (<$1)

1912-14
Q34,Q37,Q46,Q47,Q48 (<$1)

1916-20

Note: The "1916-20" BB spaces consist of a selection from three issues: 10 stamps from the 1916 issue; 10 stamps from the 1920 issue; and 5 stamps from the 1920-21 issue.

(1916)

Q61 (<$1)
Seven blank spaces: suggest Q62,Q63,Q64,Q65,Q66,Q68,Q70, (<$1)
Q74 (<$1)
One blank space: suggest Q76(<$1)

(1920)
Q82 (<$1)
Eight blank spaces: suggest Q84,Q85,Q87,Q88,Q90,Q93,Q94,Q96 (<$1)
Q98 ($1+)

(1920-21)
Q103(<$1)
Three blank spaces: suggest Q104,Q105,Q106 (<$1)
Q117(<$1)

1923-31
Q139,Q140,Q141,Q142,Q143,Q144,(<$1)
Q145,Q146,Q147,Q148,Q149,(<$1)
Q150,Q151,Q152,Q153,(<$1)
Q154,Q155,Q156,Q157,(<$1)
Q158,Q159,Q160,Q161,(<$1)
Q162,Q163,Q164,Q165,(<$1)
Q166,Q167(<$1)
Q168,Q169,Q170,Q171,(<$1)
Q172,Q173 green surcharge,(<$1)

1922
Q132,Q133,Q134,Q135,Q136, (<$1)

1929-34
Q176,Q177,Q178 (<$1)
Blank space: suggest Q180 surcharged (<$1), as Q179 is $20+!

1934 Modern Locomotive
Q181,Q182,Q183 (<$1)

1935
Q184,Q185,Q186,Q187,Q188,Q189 (<$1)
Q190,Q191,Q192,(<$1)
Q193,Q194,Q195,Q196,(<$1)

1938
Q208,Q209,Q210, ($1+-<$1)

1939
Q211,Q212,Q213,Q214 ($2+)

German Occupation stamps
1914-15
N1,N2,N3,N4, (<$1)

1916
N11,N12,N13,N14,N15,N18,N19,N20,(<$1)

1917-18
N10,N16,N17,(<$1)

The 1929-31 Scott O8 10c olive green: More Officials, as well as Postage Dues and Parcel Posts are found in the '69 and '97 editions.
Kinds of Blue
The 1969 and 1997 editions are identical in content. The editions vary enough that I will break them down by category.

Regular issues (Advantage '47, '69, '97 editions)
The 1941 edition lacks the 1936-38 spaces for 265,274, and 284. Also, the 1941 lacks the 1936-40 spaces for 298,299,301,302,303,and 307. Of interest is the 1941 has TWO spaces for the 1.50 (294): a space for the "rose lilac"('41), and a space for the "rose"('39), that subsequently Scott demoted to a minor number (294b).

Semi-Postals
Actually the various editions do NOT have all the same semi-postals.

''69 & '97 edition
Lacks B249,B252,B253,B250,B251,($2+) compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

'41 edition
Lacks B27,B39,B40,B62,B63,B74 compared to the '47, '69 and '97 editions.

Total semi-postals
1947: 184
1969 & 1997: 179
1941: 178 ( But different mixture of missing semi-postals than '69 & '97)

Postage Dues ( Advantage '69 and '97 editions)
1895-1915
The '69 and '97 have two more spaces for suggested J7 or (J8 or J9) compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

1922-32
The '69 and '97 have 8 more stamp spaces for suggested J25-J32 compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

Official Stamps ( Advantage '69 and '97 editions)
1921-22
The '69 and '97 have 8 more spaces for suggested Q11-Q21 choices.

Parcel Post ( Advantage '69 and '97 editions)
1923-31
The '69 and '97 editions have 19 more spaces to cover completely Q139-Q172 compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

1935
The '69 and '97 has space for Q195 and Q196 compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

1938
The '69 and '97 has space for Q209 and Q210 compared to the '47 and '41 editions.

Bottom Line for Big Blue editions.
1) 1997 and the 1969 have all the stamps, only lacking 5 specific semi-postals from the '47 and '41 editions.
2) 1997 and the 1969 have 41 additional stamps in postage dues, officials, and parcel post outlined above compared to the '47 and '41 editions.
3) The 1947 has all the semi-postals, but lacks the 41 stamp space improvement that the '69 and '97 editions have.
4) The 1941 edition also lacks the 41 stamp spaces added by the '69 and '97, lacks 6 specific semi-postals compared to the '47 and '97 editions, AND lacks 9 regular stamp spaces found in the '47, '69, and '97 editions.

Note 7-2011: When I initially published this blog, I was under the assumption that the '69 did not have semi-postals, and the '97 restored them from the '47 and '41 editions. I was wrong. ;-) The '69 edition I consulted had all the semi-postal pages removed by a previous owner. The error was discovered when I checked the other '69 I have. So now the blog has been corrected to reflect that all the editions have semi-postals; just not exactly the same ones. ;-) See above for specifics.

1902-06 Q45 3fr black & ultramarine
Railway/ Parcel Post: "Winged Wheel"
Big Blue Bottom Line
Big Blue provides 549 stamp spaces for Belgium, admittedly quite generous. Still, around 200 stamps could be added by the Big Blue collector.

Note: You will need to consult a Scott catalogue for specific pricing. I only give a very "ball park" price, and never the actual catalogue value.
<$1= less than a Dollar
$1+= more than a Dollar
$2+= more than two Dollars
$5+= more than five Dollars
$10+= more than ten Dollars
$20+..and so on.

6 comments:

  1. As any Belgium collector will know (one of my main areas of collecting), removing the semi-postal stamps from Belgium is a very odd thing to do since Belgian stamps include a very large number of semi-postal stamps. They are always collected as an integral part of Belgian stamps sort of like the difference between regular and commemorative stamps. Japan's "prefectural stamps" is another subdivision not seen often in other countries, but certainly semi-postals which raise extra money for a cause are very common in some countries, Switzerland included. Even the U.S.A. has issued a few.

    Belgium decided a very long time ago to do what the U.S. now does to a small extent, and that is to use its stamps as a revenue source for various causes. In the U.S., the small number of semi-postals raise money for breast cancer research and a few other causes. Belgium has for about a hundred years issued just about as many semi-postals as other stamps for various health, charity, and other causes. Leaving them out of any Belgium collection would leave you very incomplete, indeed.

    If you want a reasonable degree of completeness, you do need to include Belgium's semi-postals. I imagine most people know this. Removing Belgian semi-postals by a previous album owner seems very odd indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree. I suspect a previous owner did not want to have empty pages of semi-postals that are generally more expensive to fill.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It is with great interest and fascination I read your stories. Unfortually is your example of Merode-monument false. The "Q" looks more lika a "O". Varro Tyler desribes it i his forgeries book.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Excellent pickup Magnus. You are, of course, correct.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Busy with some belgian ones and I have a little question about Scott 60 & 82, the only difference I remark and the COB gives is that the little piece underneath the stamp is different otherwise there's no difference?
    Thanks in advance. Axel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Essentially. At least,that is what I look for.

      (I suppose there could be other minute differences with close inspection.)

      Delete