A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered by the blog author, Jim Jackson, with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Saturday, January 26, 2013

Italian Colonies

1932 Scott 7 75c carmine rose "Giosuè Carducci"
"Italian Poet, Nobel Prize in Literature, 1906"
Quick History
The generic "Italian Colonies" stamps, for general use in all colonies, were produced from 1932-1934. They supposedly could be used in Cyrenaica and Tripolitania (Became part of Italian Libya in 1934), Eritrea, and Somalia.
Italian Colonies (Libya, Eritrea, and Somalia) are in blue
Italian Libya, formed in 1934, consisted of, in part, the former colonies of Cyrenaica and Tripolitania
Italy was late off the mark with colonies in Africa, only initiating colonialism in 1890 with the colonization of Eritrea. And it was done more for enhancing the prestige of Italy, and converting native populations to Christianity, rather than for primarily economic benefits. 

But in the 1930s, Italian imperialism became molded by Fascist doctrines. Ethiopia was occupied in 1936. Then Ethiopia, and the former colonies of Eritrea and Italian Somaliland were formed into the Italian East Africa colony. Italian colonialism in Africa was ended after the defeat of Italy, Mussolini, and the Fascist regime during WWII.

Into the Deep Blue
The 2011 Scott Classic specialized catalogue, for "Italian Colonies", has, for 1932-34, 50 regular, 35 air post, and 2 air post special delivery major stamp descriptions, for a total of 87 major descriptions. The CV for these stamps are moderately expensive, and unused is less expensive then used. For a CV of $1+-$9+, 46 stamps are found, or  53%.

I don't have a huge selection, but I have some. ;-)

Stamp Gallery
1932 Scott 2 15c olive brown "Niccolò Machiavelli"
The Italian Dante Alighieri Society issue of 1932 was printed in different colors, and overprinted as shown for the Italian Colonies issue. This 12 stamp issue, quite attractive, has a CV of $1+-$2 for each stamp.

Niccolò Machiavelli, of course, a 16th century philosopher, humanist and writer, is famous for "The Prince", where glory and survival can justify the use of immoral means to achieve these ends. Hence "Machiavellian" as a pejorative term.
1932 Scott 3 20c slate green " Paolo Sarpi"
The 20c slate green with red overprint has a portrait of Paolo Sarpi, a 17th century Venetian patriot, scientist, and church reformer.

1932 Scott 5 30c red brown with black overprint
"Ugo Foscolo"
The 30c red brown features Ugo Foscolo, a 19th century writer, revolutionary, and poet. Notice how in prior centuries, one could excel in several disciplines? ;-)

1932 Scott 6 50c blue black "Giacomo Leopardi"
A 19th century philosopher and poet, Giacomo Leopardi is found on the 50c blue black.

1932 Scott 8 1.25l dark blue "Carlo Botta"
The 1.25 Lira dark blue has Carlo Botta, a 19th century historian.

One would agree, the Italians, like the French, can put together a very nicely designed stamp issue.

1933 Scott 24 20c dull violet "Pack Camel"
In 1933, a 9 stamp issue was produced for the 50th anniversary of the annexation of Eritrea. An example is shown here. The set is rather expensive, as the CV ranges from $10+-$20+ unused.

1934 Scott 43 30c slate green "Mercury and Fasces"
"Fasces" are a bundle of wooden sticks with an axe blade emerging from the center.  This 4 stamp set was for the 15th annual Trade Fair in Milan. CV is $1+. 

Deep Blue
Deep Blue (Steiner) has 8 pages for Italian Colonies, and follows the Scott catalogue exactly. Nice.

1932 Scott 4 25c dark green "Vittorio Alfieri"
Dramatist, the Founder of Italian Tragedy
Big Blue
Big Blue '69, on two pages, has 54 stamp spaces for Italian Colonies. Coverage is 62%.

Has anyone noticed that Big Blue seems to have rather generous coverage of the moderately expensive colonies of Italy? Here 62% coverage for "Italian Colonies".  Cyrenaica, for example, has 68% coverage.
Likewise, the CV for Cyrenaica was $1+-$10 for many stamps. Many Big Blue collectors (myself included) do not have a lot of the stamps of the colonies of Italy.

And there are expensive ones. ;-)

Even some stamps that do not cross the $10 threshold are close: 1933 Scott 32-37 are CV $9.50.

There are 8 stamps @ $10+, 4 stamps @ $20+, and 4 stamps @ $52+,$52+, $55, $72+. The later 4 stamps are on the "Most expensive" list. Details are provided under "Comments" after the checklist.

Checklist

1932
1,2,3,4,
6,7,8,9,
13,14,15,(16),

1933
23,24,25,26,27,28,29,
32,34,35,37,
33,36,

1934
42,43,44,45,

Next Page

1934
46,47,48,49,

Air Post
1932
C1,C2,C3,C4,
C8,C9,C10,C11,C12,

1933
C13,C14,C15,C16,
C20,C21,C22,C23,

1934
C29,C30,C31,C32,

End

Comments
A) Expensive stamps ($10 threshold):
1933 Scott 23 10c olive brown ($10+)
1933 Scott 24 20c dull violet ($10+)
1933 Scott 25 25c green ($10+)
1933 Scott 26 50c purple ($10+)
1933 Scott 27 75c carmine ($10+)
1933 Scott 28 1.25 l blue ($10+)
1933 Scott 29 2.75 l red orange ($20+)
1934 Scott 46 10c olive green ($20+)
1934 Scott 47 50c purple ($30)
1934 Scott 48 1.25l blue ($55)
1934 Scott 49 5l brown ($72+)
1933 Scott C13 50c brown orange ($10+)
1933 Scott C14 1l black violet ($10+)
1933 Scott C15 3l carmine ($20+)
1933 Scott C16 5l olive brown ($20+)
1933-34 Scott C20 50c orange brown ($10+)
1933-34 Scott C21 75c red violet ($10+)
1933-34 Scott C22 1l bister brown ($10+)
1933-34 Scott C23 3l olive gray ($10+)
1934 Scott C29 50c yellow brown (10+)
1934 Scott C30 75c deep violet ($10+)
1934 Scott C31 5l brown black ($52+)
1934 Scott C32 10l red orange ($52+)

B) (  ) around a number indicates a blank space choice.

1934 Scott 42 20c red orange "Mercury and Fasces"
Out of the Blue
Expensive, and ironically a generous selection provided by Big Blue. But I'm starting to warm up to the Italian designs.  ;-)

Note: Map appears to be in the public domain.

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