A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Monday, March 24, 2014

Netherlands

1852 Scott 2 10c lake "King William III"
Quick History
The Netherlands- literally "Low Country"- made even more so by centuries of peat extraction, borders the North Sea, Belgium, and Germany. It is technically only part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (which includes Aruba, Curacao, and Sint Maarten, and the special municipalities of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, and Saba- all in the Caribbean). The Kingdom of the Netherlands existed during the 1815-1940 years, the period covered by this classical stamp blog. Even today, it is still a constitutional monarchy.

The Kingdom of the Netherlands
The Capital is Amsterdam, the Seat of Government is The Hague, and the population was 8,700,000 in 1939.

This blog post will concentrate on the European Netherlands, and any relevant stamp issues by the other countries of the Kingdom will be reviewed at another time.

After the French withdrew in 1813, the country became a Kingdom with the proclamation of William I as King on March 16, 1815. He also became hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg. When William III died in 1890 without any male heirs, the union between Luxembourg and the Netherlands was severed. Queen Wilhelmina ruled for the Netherlands, but Luxembourg laws required a male at the time. See my Luxembourg blog post for more specifics.

Stamps for the Netherlands were issued beginning in 1852 with the portrait of King William III.

1871 Scott 17 1/2c red brown "Coat of Arms"
Into the Deep Blue
The 2011 Scott Classic Specialized catalogue, for the Netherlands 1852-1941, has 256 regular, 133 semi-postal, 12 air post, 7 marine insurance, 79 postage due, and 19 official major stamp descriptions. Total = 506. Of those, 307 are CV <$1-$1+, or 61%. The Netherlands is reasonably affordable for a European country.

I am going to split the discussion of the Netherlands into two blog posts.

The next blog post will feature a selection of the many and wonderful semi-postals that have been issued by the Netherlands.

This blog post will cover the rest. ;-)

However, I will mainly focus on the classical regular issues of 1852-1922.

A closer look at the stamps and issues
100 Cents = 1 Gulden
(Guilder or Florin)
1852 Scott 1 5c blue "King William III"
Wmk 158 - "Posthorn", Imperforate
In 1852, Netherlands issued three imperforate stamps - the 5c blue, the 10c lake, and the 15c orange yellow. King William III's image was in the vignette. A "posthorn" watermark was used on the paper- and it appears that the 1852 issue is the only one with that watermark. The paper is thick- almost like postcard. The stamp, in addition, has many minor numbers in Scott due to shades in color- Four for the 5c, four for the 10c, and two for the 15c. CV ranges from $20+-$100+.

1864 Scott 6 15c orange "King William III"
Unwmk, Perforated
In 1864, a new three stamp issue was produced on unwatermarked paper in the same colors and denominations- albeit perforated. CV is $8-$100.

One sees many of the early Netherlands issues with a "FRANCO" postmark stamp.

1869-70 Scott 8 10c lake "William III"
Perforation 14
Between 1867-70, a six stamp issue was produced of "William III", as shown.  These were issued with five different perforations, so Scott has many minor numbers for these stamps. CV ranges from $2+-$160 for the major numbers.
1869-70 Scott 9a 15c orange brown "William III"
Perforation 14
One will note here the 15c perforation 14 stamp is a minor number, while the 10c perforation 14 stamp shown before is a  major number. The 15c, 20c, 25c, 50c denominations are listed as Perf 12 3/4 X 11 3/4 for the major number.
1869 Scott 18 1c black "Coat of Arms"
The "Coat of Arms" design was used for the 1869-71 issue- some six stamps. CV ranges from $2+ to $70+.
1872 Scott 27 15c brown orange "William III"
Then between 1872-88, an eleven stamp issue was produced with, yet again, the portrait of William III.

William III was the son of William II and Anna Pavlovna of Russia. He succeeded to the throne in 1849. He initially married his first cousin Sophie, a liberal intellectual. William III was conservative, and admired the military.  Queen Victoria ( of the United Kingdom) considered him an "uneducated farmer". He was also notorious for his appetite for extramarital affairs.

He was not particularly happy that he was saddled with a constitution agreed to by his father,William II. He would rather have governed as an enlightened despot.

In 1877, Queen Sophie died, and he married Princess Emma- 41 years his junior- of the small German Principality, Waldeck and Pyrmont. ( He really wanted to marry a French opera singer, but society disapproved too much for him to succeed with that idea.)

But the marriage was happy, and Wilhelmina was born in 1880. She became the heiress presumptive in 1884, when the last of his sons died from the previous marriage.

1894 Scott 48 25c dull violet 
"Princess Wilhelmina"
Between 1891-94, an eleven stamp set was produced with Princess Wilhelmina's visage portrait. Her father, William III, had died in 1890. As Wilhelmina had not yet reached age 18 (which occurred in 1898), her mother Emma was appointed regent. Note that the portrait shows Wilhelmina when she was eleven years old. ;-)
1896 Scott 52 1g gray violet
"Princess Wilhelmina"
Between 1893-96, a similar bi-colored issue was produced for the four higher denominations. CV for the entire "Princess Wilhelmina" 1891-96 issue ranges from <$1-$20+, save for three stamps.

As the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg could only be inherited through the House of Nassau male line, Wilhelmina could not succeed as ruler there. Instead, Adolphe, Duke of Nassau, who was William's 17th cousin, once removed, assumed the title! His branch still governs the Grand Duchy today.

1920 Scott 79 40c green & orange
"Queen Wilhelmina"
Wilhelmina Helen Pauline Maria then became Queen from 1890-1948- some 58 years!

A new portrait stamp of the (now 18 year old) Queen was first issued in 1898, and continued through 1924. The 27 stamp issue featured the queen, as shown: many are in bi-colors. CV ranges from <$1-$10+.

I should mention that the six lower denominations have a "numeral of value" design-shown elsewhere on the blog post.
1899 Scott 85 5g claret "Queen Wilhelmina"
Four higher values were also issued between 1898-1905, and had this design, as illustrated. The 1g, 2 1/2g, and the 5g are a modest CV <$1-$5+, but the 10g is CV $600+. ! And, be on the lookout for a "Type I" 1g, which has a more robust "1" size numeral, and has a CV of $100+. !

1907 Scott 89 2 1/2c vermilion "
"Admiral M.A. de Ruyter and Fleet"
The first commemorative set- three stamps- for the Netherlands was issued in 1907. The set  honored Admiral De Ruyter (1607-1676), who was a naval hero during the Anglo-Dutch wars.

1913 Scott 96 25c pale blue "King William I"
For the centenary of Dutch independence, a 12 stamp issue was released with  portraits of King William I, II, III, and Queen Wilhelmina. CV ranges from <$1-$40+ for all stamps, save one.

William I ruled the Netherlands ( and Luxembourg) beginning in 1813, and proclaimed himself King of the Netherlands in 1815. He was quite conservative, and when a constitution was forced upon him in 1840, he could not abide, and he abdicated. His eldest son, William II, then acceded to the throne.

1919 Scott 103 60c on 30c , black overprint
Between 1919-21, five stamps of the "Queen Wilhelmina" variety were surcharged in various ways.  Some are quite inexpensive ($1+-$3+), but several others are $80+-$100: rather pricey indeed.

1922 Scott 111 5c carmine rose, Imperforate
"Queen Wilhelmina"
In 1922, several imperforate stamps (5c gray, 10c carmine rose), and a 5c gray perforate stamp of the 1898 Queen type were issued. The imperforate stamps should pose no problems for identification, but what about the 5c that is found perforated? I don't have an  illustration here, but the 5c gray (both perforate and imperforate) are drawn with the horizontal lines behind the queen's head much wider apart. ;-)

In the next blog post, which will concentrate on the semi-postals, perhaps I will say more about Queen Wilhelmina, especially during the trying WW II years. Stay tuned. :-)

Deep Blue
1898-1924 "Queen Wilhelmina" issue in Deep Blue
Deep Blue (Steiner) has 39 pages for the Netherlands. All of the major Scott numbers have a space. In addition, Steiner provides spaces for the many minor number syncopated perforations- a bit overkill for the classical generalist, but no doubt welcomed by the Netherlands specialist.

1926-27 Scott 173a 6c orange brown "Wilhelmina"
Syncopated Perforations Type A ( 2 sides), 12 1/2
Speaking of syncopated perforations, I thought I should show an example. ;-) They were used on issues during 1925-33, and were for use in stamp vending machines They come in three types: Type A (2 sides), Type B (4 sides), and Type C ( 2 sides-corners only). They are given minor numbers in the Scott catalogue. They generally are valued more than the ordinary perforated stamp issues.

The 1941 "Gull type of 1924-26" issue is found in the Scott Classic catalogue, but not in the "classic' Steiner pages. One can either use a quadrilled page, or "borrow" the pages from the "regular" Steiner pages.

1894 Scott 37 2 1/2c violet
"Numeral of Value"
Big Blue
Big Blue "69, on 10 pages ( Five for the semi-postals), has 140 spaces for regular, 7 air post, 35 postage due, and 125 semi-postal spaces. Of interest, BB only misses 8 semi-postal spaces.

Total = 307
Total coverage = 61%.

Of the expensive stamps in BB, there is one (1891 Scott 50 1g gray violet ($77+) ) that crosses the $35 threshold, and 21 between $10-$30+.  Of those, eleven are semi-postals. See the "comments" section for specifics.

Checklist

1852
1,2,

1864
4,5,

1867*
7,8,10,

1869-71
17,18 or 19, 21,

1876
34,35,36,37,

1872-88
23,24,25,26,27,28,30,31,

1891-94
40,41,42,43,44,45*,
46,47,48,49,50,

1896-98 (actually 1899)
83,51,52,84,

Next Page

1899-1921 (actually 1922)
55,56,57,59,60,107,
108,61,62,63,64,65,109,
66,67,68,69,70,71,73,
74,75,76,77,78,79,80,

1899-1921
81,82,106,

1907
87,88,89,

1913
90,91,92,93,94,95,96,

Next Page

1923
113,114,116,125,124,126,127,
128,129,130,131,

1933
200,

1924-29*
164, 142 or 165, 166,
143 or 168a or 168, 144,145or 169,146 or 171,
147,148,149,175,150 or 176,151 or 177,178,152 or 179,
180,153 or 181,182,154 or 183,184,155 or 187,188,
156 or 189,157 or 190,158 or 191,159 or 192,160,193,

Next Page

1933
196,197,198,199,

1934
202,203,

1936
204,205,

1937
206,207,208,

1938
209,210,211,

1939
212.213.214.215.

1940
216,217,218,219,(220),

Next Page

Air Post
1921
C1,C2,C3,

1931
C9,

1929
C6,

1938
C11,

1933
C10,

Postage Due
1907
J29,J30,J31,J32,(J33),

1920
J13 or J44, J45,J46,J47,J48,J49,J50,J51,
J52,J53,J54,J55,J56,J57,J58,J59,

1921-30
J61,J62,J63,J64,J66,J67,J68,(J69),

1906
J28,

1908
J42,

1924
J76,J77,J78,J79,

Next Page

Semi-postal
1906
B1,B2,B3,

1924
B6,B7,B8,

1925
B9,B10,B11,

1926
B12,B13,B14,B15,

1927
B21,B22,B23,B24,

Next Page

(Semi-postal)
1927
B16,B17,B18,B19,B20,

1928
B25,B26,B27,B28,B29,B30,
B31,B32,B33,B34,B35,B36,

1929
B37,B38,B39,B40,

1930
B41,
B42,B43,B44,B45,B46,B47,
B48,B49,B50,B51,B52,B53,

Next Page

(semi-postal)
1932
B54,B55,B56,B57,B58,B59,

1932
B60,B61,

1933
B62,B63,B64,B65,

1933
B66,B67,B68,B69,

1934
B70,B71,B72,

1934
B73,B74,B75,B76,

1935
B77,B78,B79,

1935
B80,B81,B82,B83,B84,B85,

Next Page

(semi-postal)
1936
B86,B87,B88,B89,
B90,B91,B92,B93,

1937
B94,B95,B96,B97,
B98,B99,B100,B101,B102,

1938
B103,B104,B105,B106,B107,
B108,B109,B110,B111,B112,

Next Page

(semi-postal)
1939
B113,B114,B115,B116,B117,

1940
B123,B124,B125,B126,B127,
B129,B130,B131,B132,B133,

End

Comments
A) Expensive stamps ($10 threshold):
1852 Scott 1 5c blue ($30+)
1952 Scott 2 10c lake ($20+)
1864 Scott 4 5c blue ($10+)
1867 Scott 10 20c dark green ($20+)
1869 Scott 21 2c buff ($10+)
1888 Scott 24 7 1/2c red brown ($10+)
1872 Scott 31 50c bister ($10+)
1894 Scott 49 50c yellow brown ($20)
1891 Scott 50 1g gray violet ($77+)
1896 Scott 51 50c emerald & yellow brown ($10+)
1896 Scott 52 1g brown & olive green ($20+)
1906 Scott B2 3c (+3c) pale olive green ($10+)
1906 Scott B3 5c (+5c) gray ($10)
1932 Scott B48 1 1/2c (+1 1/2c) blue green ($10+)
1931 Scott B49 6c (+4c) carmine rose ($10+)
1931 Scott B53 12 1/2c (+3 1/2c) ultramarine & deep orange ($20+)
1932 Scott B56 7 1/2c (+3 1/2c) bright red & black ($10+)
1932 Scott B57 12 1/2c (+2 1/2c) ultramarine & black ($10+)
1932 Scott B61 12 1/2c (+3 1/2c) ocher & ultramarine ($10+)
1933 Scott B65 12 1/2c (+3 1/2c) ultramarine ($10+)
1933 Scott B69 12 1/2c (+3 1/2c) dark blue & silver ($10+)
1934 Scott B76 12 1/2c (+3 1/2c) ultramarine ($10+)
B) (  ) around a number indicates a blank space choice.
C) * 1867- there are also many minor numbers for Scott 7,8,10, based on different perforations.
D) *45- is yellow brown. BB asks for "orange brown"- 45a.
E) *1924-29- choices are unwmk vs wmk 202 "Circles".
1898 Scott 59 2c yellow brown "Numeral of Value"
Out of the Blue
The Netherlands classical issues, unlike some other European nations, are quite reasonable in price- considering they are indeed classics. And, to my eye, they are attractive indeed.

And, the Netherlands also issued many quite attractive semi-postals. We will have a look at those with the next entry.

Note: Map appears to be in the public domain.

Comments are always welcomed.

8 comments:

  1. Another nice post.

    Re your 15c orange red with the numeral lozenge cancel, if you have a guess as to the number, it can be identified. If it is "40" is would be canceled at Goor. The other candidate that seems possible is "10" which would make it Bergen op Zoom.

    The Netherlands assigned numerals alphabetically (generally speaking) rather than by importance of post office.

    I don't comment as often as I should, but you are doing great work.

    cjd

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks cjd- you are a fount of information!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Jim,
    I have 125 semi-postals in the '97 Big Blue, making for a total of 307 stamps.
    Joe

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks Joe- I changed the figures.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi - I am completely new to this. I was given a handful of stamps about a decade ago and am now checking them against Stampworld. My question is about a Queen Wilhelmina from the 1920s. It's a dark green 5 cents. It appears to be imperforate on the left side, sliced in fact into the colour. The image is not properly centred and is noticeable on the bottom. Is it rare, or worth more than 99cents? Thanks for any input.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello Hazel

    I seriously doubt if this damaged stamp is worth anything.

    Sorry about that.

    ReplyDelete
  7. In one of my few divergences from the Jim Method, my '97 Big Blue has, for the Postage Dues, 1881-1920 (should be 1921 due to the 7c), with each space saying Pale Ultramarine. I've plugged in the J44-J59 bunch into these due to color.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Joe - I think my '69 says the same thing. It is headed by 1881-1920, and all the descriptions are for "pale ultramarine" (J45,J46,J47,J48,J49,J50,J51,
      J52,J53,J54,J55,J56,J57,J58,J59,), except for the first illustration, where I put J13 or J44. Perhaps you don't have the illustration for the 1/2c?

      Delete