A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

United States

1857-61 Scott 24 1c blue, Type V "Franklin"
Quick History
The United States (50 of them) is located "from sea (Atlantic) to shining sea (Pacific)" in North America. Forty-eight States are between Canada and Mexico, plus Hawaii and Alaska. United States stamps are also used on Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Wake and Midway islands in the Pacific Ocean.

U.S. Territorial Acquisitions since 1783
The Pilgrim Fathers (1620), the Boston Tea Party (1773), the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Revolutionary War (1775-1783), the Constitution (1788), the Bill of Rights (1791), the Louisiana Purchase (1803), the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806), the Monroe Doctrine (1823), Manifest Destiny (19th century doctrine and belief), the Civil War (1861-65), and the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) all profoundly shaped the United States, and are reflected in the classical era stamp issue founders portraits, historical topics, and designs.

General issue stamps were introduced in 1847, with a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, a Founding Father and polymath, and George Washington, the "Father of his Country".

The capital is Washington, D.C., and the population was 76 million in 1900.

1861 Scott 68 10c green "Washington"
Into the Deep Blue
The 2014 Scott Classic Specialized 1840-1940 catalogue has, for United States 1847-1940, 950 major number descriptions.

In addition, the 1840-1940 catalogue has 502 revenue stamp catalogue numbers, and 550 cut square numbers for stamped envelopes and wrappers. I am not including them, as I don't collect these categories.

Also not included are the 14 catalogue numbers for the general issue Confederate States of America, as I collect them separately. (Note: the Scott 1840-1940 catalogue additionally lists ten pages of  Confederate postmasters provisionals.)

Then in the catalogue are 1X-11X numbers (32)  for Postmasters Provisionals. As these are some of the most expensive pieces of paper on earth (CV $1,000+- $100,000+), I don't include them either.

How to approach a blog post about U.S. stamp issues, my home country? My immediate inclination is to publish  4-5 blog posts in order to do some justice to the complicated and fascinating philatelic history. Rather, I will do a general review of the 1847-1901 era, that, by necessity leaves much out. If the WW collector is unfamiliar with the issues, perhaps the overview will whet the appetite? And for those WW collectors who are quite familiar with U.S. classical stamps, well, humor me. ;-)

A closer look at the stamps and issues
100 Cents = 1 Dollar
1847 Scott 1 5c brown 
"Benjamin Franklin"
On July 1, 1847, the imperforate  5c "Franklin" and the 10c black "Washington" were released, the first general issues for the United States. All of the issues from 1847-1894 were unwatermarked, as well as being engraved.

As Benjamin Franklin is considered the "father" of the American Postal Services, he was honored with the first stamp value.

The earliest documented use of the 5c was July, 7, 1847.

A number of the 1847-51 shades for the 5c were identified by Dr. Carol Chase, and traced to a particular year of issue. He identified some 14 shades, and the colors tend to grade gradually from one to another. Scott lists "red brown" as the major number color (most common), and adds four minor number shades (brown orange- least common). There are four additional shades listed as a subset of the major or minor numbers.

A pen cancel (illustrated) is not unusual, but reduces the CV $525 value in half.

1853-55 Scott 11A 3c dull red, type II
"Washington"
The second 1851-57 issue, also imperforate, consists of five portrait designs (1c "Franklin", 3c "Washington", 5c "Jefferson", and 10c and 12c "Washington"). Scott parses the five denominations into 17 major numbers. The major numbers- and major expense!, is based on how completely, or incompletely the outer frame is evident, primarily for the 1c blue and 10c green varieties. To wit, Scott 5 1c blue, type I (the complete frame showing) is CV $85,000 used! Needless to say, very few collectors own the major number complete set. And certificates are definitely required for all higher valued stamps.

The 3c "Washington" has four major numbers: Scott 10 3c orange brown, type I, Scott 10A 3c orange brown, type II, Scott 11 3c dull red, type I, and Scott 11A 3c dull red, type II.

The dull reds (type I & type II) are only CV $15.

Type II: Outer frame line on all four sides
& Inner frame line recut on the sides
Type II (1853-55 Scott 11A 3c dull red) has, on the sides of the stamp, a recut and prominent inner frame line, as well as an outer frame line.

Type I: Outer frame line on all four sides
But Inner frame line on the sides are NOT recut
Type I (1855 Scott 11 3c dull red) has an outer frame line, but the inner frame line is not recut, and is not prominent.

1857-61 Scott 33 10c green, "type V"
"Washington"
The 1957-61 issue is perforated, and uses the same five portrait designs as the imperforate 1851-57 issue, and then adds a new design 24c "Washington", 30c "Franklin", and 90c "Washington" stamps.

Scott recognizes 27 major numbers, based on color shades and "types".

The 1c blue has seven "types", while the 10c green (illustrated) has five "types".

The CV for the 10c green, "type V" is $65.

(I put "type V" in quotes, as I have not spent the time to make absolutely sure of the identification (it is tedious), and so place the stamp, for now, in the lowest CV type.) 

1862 Scott 70a  24c brown lilac "Washington"
The 1961-62 issue (nine stamps) used the same denominations as the 1857-61 issues, but changed the designs.

Why?

From the Postmaster General report of 1861: "In order to prevent fraudulent use of the large quantity of stamps unaccounted for, in the hands of postmasters in the disloyal states, it was deemed advisable to change the design and the color...".

For the 24c denomination, the 1860 gray lilac stamp "Washington" had the frame altered for the 1861 issue 24c , and the stamp was issued in brown lilac (illustrated) or red lilac shades.

In 1862, the 24c was issued in lilac (Scott gives this color a different major number-Scott 78), with minor number color shades grayish lilac, gray, and blackish violet (CV 17,500!).

1863 Scott 73 2c black "Andrew Jackson"
In 1863, the "Black Jack" was issued (CV $65). One can argue that this stamp is in the top ten of all time U.S. designs.

Indian Removal "Trail of Tears" 1836-39
Jackson was larger than life, and served as President between 1829-1837, having founded the Democratic Party, and bringing in the "spoils system".  He had hundreds of slaves on his Hermitage Plantation, and killed a man (Charles Dickinson) in a duel, sparked initially by defending the honor of his wife, Rachel. He has left a legacy that is still controversial today.

He signed the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which transplanted native tribes from the South to Indian Territory ( Oklahoma).

1867 Scott 88 3c rose "Washington"
E. Grill
In 1867 (continuing through 1871), stamps were embossed with grills, in order, so the theory goes, of making it more difficult to wash off cancellations and re-use the stamp.

The grills had different sizes (A. Grill- F. Grill, Z. Grill), and some of the grilled stamps are quite rare. Hence, ordinary stamps without grills, such as the 1861 Scott 63 1c blue "Franklin"(CV $50), became price worthy with a grill ( 1867 Scott 85A 1c blue "Z. grill" (CV $ 3,000,000).

(Note: I have a blog post about this- "How to fill those pesky million dollar spaces in Deep Blue". Also note the date published.  ;-)

E. Grill about 11 X 13mm
(14 by 15 to 17 points)
With many dollars riding on the outcome, the art and science of grill measurement is another skill the U.S. serious collector will need to master. ;-)

1869 Scott 112 1c buff "Franklin"
Hard wove paper, G. Grill
The 1869 eleven stamp portrait and pictorial issue all had grills (G. grill).

The 1869 issue is on hard wove paper, which is somewhat "snappy" when flipping the stamp. One can use this characteristic to help identify similar wove paper found with the 1870 issue "National" Bank Note stamps.

The 1869 issue is rather hard to find well centered.

1870 Scott 136 3c green "Washington"
H. Grill
National Bank Note Company
The 1870- 1879 "Bank Note" issues , so named because they were produced by the National (1870-71), Continental (1873), and American (1879) Bank Note Companies, are challenging, and a bit frustrating as well. Challenging, because identification relies on paper characteristics, and so called "secret marks".

The first issue, the 1870-71 National Bank Note stamps, are characteristically on wove paper, which has a "snappy" feel, like the 1869 portrait/pictorial stamps.

The National Bank Note production is further sub-divided into the "grilled" 1870-71 issue (eleven stamps), and the "without grill" 1870-71 issue (eleven stamps).

Unfortunately, the grills found (I. Grill, and especially the H. Grill) are often incomplete and faint, with only a few points evident. The grilled stamps are also rarer- and more CV expensive- than the "without grill" 1870-71 stamp issue.

The 3c 1870-71 green (illustrated) with grill is CV $30+, while the no grill 3c 1870-71 green is CV $2.


1870 Scott 136 3c green with Grill
National Bank Note Company
No Secret Mark
One additional characteristic, besides paper, for the 1870-71 National Bank Note issues is they do NOT have secret marks  on the 1c to 15c denominations. (The secret marks are found beginning with the 1873 Continental Bank Note issues.)

Illustrated is a close-up of the 1870-71 3c green. The under part of the upper tail of the left ribbon is not heavily shaded.

1873 Scott 158 3c green
Continental Bank Note Company
With Secret Mark
In contrast, note the heavy shading on the underside of the upper left ribbon. That is the secret mark.

1870 Scott 155 90c carmine
"Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry"
White Wove Paper without Grill
National Bank Note Company
An eleven stamp issue by the National Bank Note Company on wove paper was also issued, as mentioned, without grill. The "without grill" issue is more common than the "grill" versions.

The 90c carmine has a portrait of Commodore Perry.

Battle of Lake Eire
He was considered a war hero by leading the American forces in a naval victory at the battle of Lake Eire during the War of 1812 against Britain.

1873 Scott 160 7c orange vermilion
"Edwin M. Stanton"
Secretaty of War in the Lincoln Administration
White Wove Paper, Thin to Thick
Secret Marks on 1c,2c,3c,6c,7c,10c,12c,15c
Continental Bank Note Company
The contract for postage stamps had passed to the Continental Bank Note Company by 1873, and they produced designs of the 1870-71 issue, but with secret marks on the 1c to 15c denominations.

Secret marks were added to the dies of the 24c, 30c, and 90c, but new plates were never made. These stamps are distinguished by shades and paper.

1873 Scott 160 7c orange vermilion
Continental Bank Note Company
Secret Mark: Lower right hand corner ball
Have two semi-circles drawn 
The secret mark for the 1873 Scott 160 7c orange vermilion consists of two semi-circles found on the lower right hand corner ball ornament.

Consult Scott for illustrations of all the secret marks.

1879 Scott 183 2c vermilion "Jackson"
Soft Porous Paper from Thin to Thick
American Bank Note Company
The Continental Bank Note Company was consolidated with the American Bank Note Company on February 4, 1879. Paper used for the ABNC issues is on soft porous paper.

The 1879 2c vermilion "Jackson", on soft porous paper by the ABNC, was also issued in 1875 in yellowish wove paper by the CBNC.

1879 Scott 189 15c red orange 
"Daniel Webster"
Soft Porous Paper
American Bank Note Company
The 1879 ABNC ten stamp issue, then, is distinguished by the soft porous paper.

Daniel Webster served in the House of Representatives, as a Senator from Massachusetts, and as Secretary of State under three presidents. He was the Whig Party nominee for President in 1836, 1840, and 1852.

He was known for his powerful oratory.

1881 Scott 208 6c rose "Lincoln"
Design of 1873 Re-engraved
Four designs from the 1873 issue were re-engraved in 1881-82. Included was the Scott 208 6c rose "Lincoln".

The Re-engraved 6c rose has three vertical lines
 from the edge of the panel to the outside of the stamp.
Original has four vertical lines.
The re-engraved version can be distinguished by three vertical lines from the edge of the panel to the outside of the stamp. With the original, four vertical lines are found.

1890 Scott 227 15c indigo "Henry Clay"
Issue has no triangles in upper corners
A new twelve stamp engraved series was produced in 1890-93 in a smaller format. This set can be readily identified by the fact that there are no drawn triangles in the upper corners as found with subsequent issues.

Senator Henry Clay, another skilled orator from Kentucky, was a leading war hawk that brought the nation into the War of 1812 with Britain.

He ran for president five times (unsuccessfully), and was Secretary of State under John Quincy Adams.

He was a principled man, but helped broker many important compromised agreements in the Senate.

Abraham Lincoln greatly admired Clay.

1893 Scott 239 30c orange brown
"Columbus at La Rabida"
Columbian Exposition Issue
The last stamps printed by a private company (ABNC), before the Bureau of Engraving took over, are the iconic engraved sixteen stamp Columbian Exposition Issue of 1893. It is not too much of an exaggeration to say that it was the yardstick by which a classical U.S. collection was traditionally measured. A reasonably complete collection, such as mine, might go up to the 50c denomination. But an excellent collection will have the $1,$2,$3,$4, and $5 denominations also.

The $5 stamp, with a CV value of $1,400 used, had only 21,844 copies available.

How much was $5 back in 1893? The average laborer and the average carpenter in 1890, for a 60 hour work week, made $9 and $19 respectively.

Beginning of Bureau Issues
1894 Scott 253 3c purple "Jackson"
Triangles in upper corners; unwatermarked
The first issue of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was the 1894 unwatermarked seventeen stamp issue. The Bureau of Engraving then printed all the classical era U.S. stamps until the 1943-44 Overrun Countries Issue, produced by the ABNC.

The 1894 issue was similar to the ABNC 1890-93 issue, except triangles were placed in the upper corners.

Note this issue is distinguished from the next one by the unwatermaked paper.

1895 Scott 274 15c dark blue "Henry Clay"
Same Designs as 1894 Issue
Watermarked Double-lined "USPS"
The 1895 sixteen stamp issue is similar to the 1894 issue, but on watermarked paper (Wmk 191).

Wmk 191- Double Lined "USPS" in Capitals
Wmk 190- "USPS" in Single-lined Capitals
U.S. collectors only have to worry about two watermarks: "Wmk 191" and "Wmk 190". Before we, as WW collectors, get too smug about our own watermarking experience (Brazil; 11 watermarks!), the U.S. watermarks can be vexing. The "U" or "S" or "P" or "S" are separated, and only one letter may show up on a stamp..... and then, often only a partial letter! And, the watermark may not be very prominent.

Many U.S. stamps are unwatermarked.  But Wmk 191 was used circa 1895-1910, including the earlier Washington-Franklin issues. and Wmk 190 was used circa 1910-1915, during the middle issue Washington-Franklins.

1898 Scott 282 6c lake "Garfield"
1898 Issue: 1c, 4c, 5c, 6c, 10c in different colors
than 1894 Designs
In 1898, five stamps from the preceding issue were produced with new colors.

Garfield Assassination
James Garfield began serving as President on March 4, 1881, but was assassinated on July 2, 1881.

1898 Scott 289 8c violet brown
"Troops Guarding Wagon Train"
Trans-Mississippi Exposition Issue
The Columbian Exposition issue of 1893 initiated a trend for honoring expositions by issuing commemorative stamps.

The Trans-Mississippi Exposition held in Omaha, Nebraska June 1- November 1, 1898 was celebrated with a nine stamp issue (up to $2 denomination), depicting the wild west. (Of interest, Omaha is not on the Mississippi, but on the Missouri River.)

This might be my U.S. favorite issue, as it is the first one to have recent American contemporary scenes (of the wild west) portrayed.

One can also view the "Indian Hunting Buffalo" 4c stamp heading the Big Blue section of this post.

1901 Scott 297 5c ultramarine & black
"Bridge at Niagara Falls"
Pan-American Exposition Issue
Another exposition (Pan-American held in Buffalo, N.Y. May 1-November 1, 1901) lead to a picturesque six stamp bi-colored issue. The industrial boosterism of the early 20th century is in evidence with the depiction of fast lake and ocean navigation, a train, an automobile, the Niagara Falls bridge, and the Great Lakes canal locks.

The 8c "Canal Locks at Sault Ste. Marie" stamp is also shown fronting the "Out of the Blue" section of the post.

Note the heavily embellished frames (American Rococo?).

With the two passes through the printing press required, because of the bi-color, the not unexpected happened. The 1c green & black, the 2c carmine and black, and the 4c deep red brown & black are known to exist inverted (CV $12,500, $55,000, & $75,000 respectively). 

Deep Blue
1901 Pan-American Exposition Issue in Deep Blue
Deep Blue (Steiner) has 91 pages (including officials) for the 1847-1940 stamps of the United States. All Scott major numbers have a space.

The Steiner lays out the issues in a nice manner, and easily follows the modern Scott catalogue.

In addition, there are 12 pages for Newspaper stamps, and 1 page for the 1934-40 Hunting Permit Stamps. These pages are presently quite empty.

Although Revenue stamps and cut squares also have spaces, I did not printout those sections, as they have no interest for me.

1898 Scott 287 4c orange
"Indian Hunting Buffalo"
Big Blue
I should mention at the outset that most U.S. based WW collectors tend to have a separate (and often expanded) U.S. collection housed in a U.S. specialty album, rather than have their primary U.S. collection in BB.

Still, for the sake of BB, we need to know what spaces are there if one wishes to "fill" a BB, or to house a secondary U.S. collection. And collectors who use BB from other countries might very well use BB's pages exclusively for the U.S.

And the fact is BB does include many more varied spaces for U.S. stamps compared to what they offer for all other countries. And paper considerations (Bank Note Issues), and watermarks (1895 issue, Washington-Franklin issues) are important too.

And BB does include a Scott number (or a choice of Scott numbers) for every space! Imagine if they had done that for all the countries in BB: well, I probably wouldn't have had a need to develop a check list. ;-)

But there is one major fact, even if the choices for stamps are less in BB than in a specialty album: Expense!

Classical era U.S. stamps have a high CV.

Full Stop.

Suffice to say there are 201 spaces that require a CV $10+ stamp.

And of those, 86 are CV $35-$1,000, in the "Most Expensive" category. !!!

Specifically, I will look at that situation in detail with the next blog post: "United States- Most Expensive Stamps"- which will review all the high end stamps with spaces in Big Blue.

O.K. let's look at what BB offers.....

Big Blue has 719 total spaces by my count. (Actually 713 minus the Confederate States, which are listed separately.) (This is 29 pages total plus a page for Confederate States.)

But  only 627 spaces for the U.S are "active" for me. (22 pages, plus a page for Confederate States.)

The categories for the 627 spaces include regular issue (533 spaces), air post (20 spaces), parcel post (12 spaces), special handling (4 spaces), parcel post due (5 spaces), special delivery (12 spaces), postage due (24 spaces), registration (1 space), air post special delivery (2 spaces), newspaper (6 spaces), and Offices (China) (8 spaces).

Coverage by Big Blue (in the categories I collect outlined above) is 627/950, or 66%.

The coverage is actually quite good, except for the annoying telescoping of spaces for different perforation varieties (which is typical of BB).

As far as the other spaces in BB.....

* The  6 stamp spaces for the Confederate States I collect separately.

* I do not collect the 79 spaces for cut squares. Personally, I'm not interested in cut squares (from stamped envelopes and wrappers). One could argue that cut squares should no longer be included in BB, considering the general lack of interest, and the fact this is really now a sub-specialty area. And, today, entire envelopes are preferred as a collectible, rather than "cut" squares. Stamp fashion changes.

* I do not (at present) collect the 7 spaces for the 1934-40 Hunting Permit stamps.

Note: Revenue stamp spaces were in the 1940s BB editions, but removed with the 1969 edition.

Checklist

The Scott Number is printed in the space in BB

1847
1,2,

1851-1856
9,11,(14 or 15),

1857-60
24,26,35,

1861-67
63,73,65,76,68,69,78,
(Grill)
92,93,94,96,97,98,(88),

1869
112,113,114,115,
116,117,(119),

Next Page

1870-71 (National Bank Note)
134*,135*,136*,145,146,147,
148,149,150,151,152,

1873 (Continental Bank Note)
156,157,158,159,160,161,162,

1873
163,165,

1875
178,179,

1879  (American Bank Note)
182,183,

1879 (American Bank Note)
184,185,186,187* or 188,189,190,

1882
205,

1881-82 (Re-engraved)
206,207,208,209,

1883
210,211,

Next Page

1887
212,213,214,

1888
215,216,217,

1890-93
219,219D,220,221,222,223,224,
225,226,227,228,229,

1893
230,231,232,233,
234,235,236,237,
238,239,240,(241 or 242),

1894 (Unwatermarked)
246,247,248,250,251,252,253,

Next Page

1894 (Unwatermarked)
254,255,256,257,258,259,260,

1895 (Watermark 191)
264,265,266,267,268,269,270,
271,272,273,274,275,276,

1898-99
279,279B,280,281,282,282C or 283,284,

1898
285,286,287,288,
289,290,291,

1901
294,295,296,297,298,299,

Next Page

1902-06
300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307,
308,309,310,311,319,314,320,

1904
323,324,325,326,327,

1907
328,329,330,

1908-09 (Wmk 191, Perf 12)
331,332,333,334,335,336,337,
338,339,340,341,342,
(Imperforate)
343,344,345,346,347,

Next Page

1909
367,368,370,371,372,373,

1910-11 (Wmk 190)
374,375,376,377,378,379,
380,381,382,383,384,

1913-15
397 or 401,398 or 402,399 or 403,400 or 404,

1912
408,409.

1912-15*
405 or 424,406 or 425,426,427,428,429,407 or 430,
414 or 431,415 or 432,416 or 433,434,417 or 435,418 or 437,
419 or 438,420 or 439,421 or 440,

Next Page

1912
422,423 or 460,

1916-19* (Unwmk)
462 or 498,463 or 499,464 or 501,465 or 503,466 or 504,

1916-19* (Unwmk)
468 or 506,469 or 507,471 or 509,472 or 510,473 or 511,474 or 512,513,
475 or 514,476 or 515,516,477 or 517,478 or 518,479,480,

1916-19 (Imperforate)
481,482,483,

1922-31*
551 or 653,552 or 581 or 632,553 or 582 or 633,554 or 583 or 634,
555 or 584 or 635,556 or 585 or 636,557 or 586 or 637,558 or 587 or 638,
559 or 588 or 639, 560 or  589 or 640,561 or 590 or 641,562 or 591 or 642,
623 or 697,563 or 692,564 or 693,622 or 694,565 or 695,566 or 696,567 or 698,
568 or 699,569 or 700,570 or 701,571,572,573,

Next Page

1923-26 (Imperforate)
575,576 or 631,577,

1923-25 (Coil)
597 or 604,598 or 605,599 or 606,600,

1923-32 (Coil)
601,602,723,603,

1918-20
547,524,

1919
537,

1920
548,549,550,

1923
610 or 612,611,

1924
614,615,616,

1926
627,

1925
617,618,619,

1925
620,621,

1926
629,

1927
643,

1926
628,

Next Page

1927
644,

1928
645,

1928
646,

1928
647,648,

1928
649,650,

1929
651,

1929
657,

1929
654 or 655, 656,

1929
658,659,660,661,

1929
662,663,664,665,666,667,668,
669,670,671,672,673,674,675,
676,677,678,679,

Next Page

1929
680,

1929
681,

1930
682,

1930
683,

1930
688,

1930
684,685,686,687,

1930
689,

1930
690,

1931
702,

1931
703,

1932
716,

1932
717,

1932
704,705,706,707,708,709,710,
711,712,713,714,715,720,

1932
718,719,

1932
724,

1932
725,

1933
726,

Next Page

1933-34
727 or 752,728,729,730A or 776,731A or 767,
732,733 or 753,734,
735A or 753,
736,737,738,739,
740,744,747,749,
741,742,743,745,
746,748,

Next Page

1934-35 (Imperforate)
754,755,
751 or 756 or 769A,760,763,765,
757,750 or 758 or 770A,759,761,
762,764,771,

1935-36
772,773,775,
776,782,783,

Next Page

1935-37
774,784,777,
778,
785,786,787,
788,789,790,791,
792,793,794,

Next Page

1937
795,796,798,
797,
799,800,801,802,

1938
835,836,837,838,

Next Page

1938-39
803,804,805,806,807,808,809,
810,811,812,813,814,815,816,
817,818,819,820,821,822,823,
824,825,826,827,828,829,830,
831,832,833,834,
(Coil)
839,840,841,842,843,844,845,
846,847,848,849,850,851,

Next Page

1939-40
852,853,854,857,
855,856,858,
894,896,898,
895,897,902,

Next Page

1940
859,860,861,862,863,
864,865,866,867,868,
869,870,871,872,873,
874,875,876,877,878,
879,880,881,882,883,

Next Page

1940
884,885,886,887,888,
889,890,891,892,893,
899,900,901,

Next Page

Air Post
1918
C1,C2,C3,

1923
C4,C5,C6,

1926-27
C7,C8,C9,

1927
C10,

1928
C11,

1930-31
C12 or C16,

1932
C17,

1933
C18,

1934
C19,

1935-37
C20,C21,C22,

1938
C23,

1939
C24,

Next Page

Parcel Post
1912-13
Q1,Q2,Q3,Q4,
Q5,Q6,Q7,Q8,
Q9,Q10,Q11,Q12,

Special Handling
1928-29
QE1,QE2,QE3,QE4,

Parcel Post Due
JQ1,JQ2,JQ3,
JQ4,JQ5,

Next Page

Special Delivery
1885
E1,

1888
E2,

1893
E3,

1894
E4,

1895
E5,

1902
E6,

1908
E7,

1911-14
E8 or E9,

1916-17
E10 or E11,

1922-27
E12 or E15,

1925-31
E13 or E16,

1925
E14,

Registration
1911
F1,

Air Post Special Delivery
1934-36
CE1,CE2,

Next Page

Newspaper
(1895-97)
PR114,(PR115),(PR116),(PR117),(PR118),(PR119),

Offices in China
1919
K1,K2,K3,K4,K5,K6,K7,(K10),

Postage Due
1879-93
J1,(J2),(J3),(J15),(J16),(J22),(J23),

1894-23
J61,(J62),(J63),(J64),(J65),(J66),(J67),

1930-33*
J69 or J79,J70 or J80,J71 or J81,J72 or J82,J73 or J83,J74 or J84,J75 or J85,J76 or J86,
J77,J78,

Next Page

Envelopes
1853-61
U10,U19,U27,

1861
U34,(U35),

1863-64
U56,(U54),

1864-65
U59,(U58),

1870-71
U76,U80,

1870-71
U82,(U84),U86,U88,

Next Page

1874-86
U113,(U116),U142,(U143),
U163,(U164),(U167),U178,
U181,(U182),U189,(U190),

1882
U222,

1876
U218,(U219),

1883
U227,

Next Page

1883-86
U231,(U232),U250,U277,

Letter Sheet
1886
U293,

1887-94
U294,(U300),(U304),U311,
U324,(U325),U330,(U331),

Next Page

1893
U348,U349,U350,
U351,

1899
U352,(U353),U358 or U362 or U367,U371 or U373 or U374,

1903
U379,U385,U390,U393,

Next Page

1907-16
U400,(U401),U402,U406,
U411,(U412),U416,U418,

1916-25
U420,U481,U422,U429,
U436,(U437),U440,U443,

1920-21
U448,(U449),U458,(U459),

Next Page

Air Post envelopes
1928-34
UC1 or UC2,UC3,UC4,

Next Page

Confederate States
Six spaces-separate entry

Next Page

Hunting Permit
1934-40
RW1,RW2,RW3,
RW4,RW5,RW6,
RW7,

End

Comments
A) Expensive stamps ($10 threshold):
1847 Scott 1 5c red brown/bluish ($425)
1847 Scott 2 10c black/bluish ($1,000)
1852 Scott 9 1c blue, Type IV ($100)
1855 Scott 11 3c dull red, Type I ($10+)
1855 (Scott 14 or 15) 10c green Type II or III ($160)
1857 Scott 24 1c blue, Type V ($40)
1859 Scott 35 10c green, Type V ($65)
1861 Scott 63 1c blue ($50)
1863 Scott 73 2c black ($65)
1863 Scott 76 5c brown ($475)
1861 Scott 68 10c green ($60)
1861 Scott 69 12c black ($100)
1862 Scott 78 24c lilac ($350)
1867 Scott 92 1c blue ($475)
1867 Scott 93 2c black ($60)
1867 Scott 94 3c red ($10)
1867 Scott 96 10c yellow green ($260)
1867 Scott 97 12c black ($275)
1867 Scott 98 15c black ($300)
1867 (Scott 88) 3c rose ($20+)
1869 Scott 112 1c buff ($150)
1869 Scott 113 2c brown ($90)
1869 Scott 114 3c ultramarine ($10+)
1869 Scott 115 6c ultramarine ($225)
1869 Scott 116 10c yellow ($140)
1869 Scott 117 12c green ($140)
1869 (Scott 119) 15c brown & blue, Type II ($250)
1870 Scott 134 1c ultramarine ($210)
1870 Scott 135 2c red brown ($80)
1870 Scott 136 3c green ($30+)
1870 Scott 145 1c ultramarine ($20+)
1870 Scott 146 2c red brown ($20)
1870 Scott 148 6c carmine ($20+)
1871 Scott 149 7c vermilion ($100)
1870 Scott 150 10c brown ($35)
1870 Scott 151 12c dull violet ($220)
1870 Scott 152 15c bright orange ($220)
1873 Scott 157 2c brown ($20+)
1873 Scott 159 6c dull pink ($20)
1873 Scott 160 7c orange vermilion ($90)
1873 Scott 161 10c brown ($20+)
1873 Scott 162 12c black violet ($140)
1873 Scott 163 15c yellow orange ($160)
1873 Scott 165 30 gray black ($140)
1875 Scott 178 2c vermilion ($10+)
1875 Scott 179 5c blue ($20+)
1879 Scott 185 5c blue ($10+)
1879 Scott 186 6c pink ($30)
1879 Scott 188 10c brown, secret mark ($30+)
1879 Scott 189 15c red orange ($30+)
1879 Scott 190 30c full black ($100)
1882 Scott 205 5c yellow brown ($10+)
1881 Scott 208 6c rose ($110)
1883 Scott 211 4c blue green ($20+)
1887 Scott 214 3c vermilion ($60)
1888 Scott 215 4c carmine ($20+)
1888 Scott 216 5c indigo ($10+)
1888 Scott 217 30c orange brown ($120)
1890 Scott 224 6c brown red ($20+)
1893 Scott 225 8c lilac ($10+)
1890 Scott 227 15c indigo ($20+)
1890 Scott 228 30c black ($40)
1890 Scott 229 90c orange ($150)
1893 Scott 232 3c green ($10+)
1893 Scott 235 6c purple ($20+)
1893 Scott 236 8c magenta ($10+)
1903 Scott 238 15c dark green ($82+)
1893 Scott 239 30c orange brown ($100)
1893 Scott 240 50c slate blue ($200)
1893 (Scott 241) $1 salmon ($650)
1894 Scott 251 2c carmine, Type II ($10+)
1894 Scott 252 2c carmine, Type III ($10+)
1894 Scott 253 3c purple ($10+)
1894 Scott 254 4c dark brown ($10)
1894 Scott 255 5c chocolate ($10)
1894 Scott 256 6c dull brown ($30)
1895 Scott 257 8c violet brown ($20+)
1894 Scott 258 10c dark green ($20+)
1894 Scott 259 15c dark blue ($70)
1894 Scott 260 50c orange ($160)
1895 Scott 274 15c dark blue ($10+)
1895 Scott 275 50c orange ($40)
1895 Scott 276 $1 black, Type I ($100)
1898 Scott 284 15c olive green ($10+)
1898 Scott 287 4c orange ($20+)
1898 Scott 288 5c dull blue ($20+)
1898 Scott 289 8c violet brown ($50)
1898 Scott 290 10c gray violet ($35)
1898 Scott 291 50c sage green ($210)
1901 Scott 296 4c deep red brown & black ($10+)
1901 Scott 297 5c ultramarine & black ($10+)
1901 Scott 298 8c brown violet & black ($55)
1901 Scott 299 10c yellow brown & black ($30+)
1902 Scott 308 13c purple black ($10+)
1903 Scott 309 15c olive green ($10+)
1903 Scott 310 50c orange ($37+)
1903 Scott 311 $1 black ($95)
1906 Scott 314 1c blue green ($10+)
1906 Scott 320 2c carmine ($10+)
1904 Scott 325 3c violet ($30)
1904 Scott 326 5c dark blue ($20+)
1904 Scott 327 10c red brown ($30)
1907 Scott 330 5c blue ($30+)
1909 Scott 339 13c blue green ($10+)
1909 Scott 341 50c violet ($20+)
1909 Scott 342 $1 violet brown ($100)
1909 Scott 346 4c orange brown ($10+)
1909 Scott 347 5c blue ($20+)
1909 Scott 368 2c carmine ($10+)
1909 Scott 371 2c carmine ($10+)
1909 Scott 373 2c carmine ($20)
1911 Scott 380 8c olive green ($10+)
1911 Scott 382 15c pale ultramarine ($20+)
1913 Scott 399 5c blue ($10)
1913 Scott 400 10c orange yellow ($20+)
1914 Scott 420 30c orange red ($10+)
1915 Scott 440 50c violet ($20)
1912 Scott 422 50c violet ($20+)
1912 Scott 423 $1 violet brown ($80)
1917 Scott 479 $2 dark blue ($40)
1917 Scott 480 $5 light green ($35)
1917 Scott 483 3c violet, Type I ($10)
1923 Scott 573 $5 carmine & black ($10+)
1920 Scott 547 $2 carmine & black ($40)
1918 Scott 524 $5 deep green & black ($35)
1920 Scott 550 5c deep blue ($10+)
1924 Scott 616 5c dark blue ($10+)
1925 Scott 619 5c dark blue ($10+)
1925 Scott 621 5c dark blue & black ($10)
1928 Scott 648 5c dark blue ($10+)
1929 Scott 661 3c violet ($10+)
1929 Scott 664 6c red orange ($10+)
1929 Scott 665 7c black ($20+)
1929 Scott 666 8c olive green ($65)
1929 Scott 667 9c light rose ($10+)
1929 Scott 668 10c yellow orange ($10+)
1929 Scott 672 3c violet ($10+)
1929 Scott 673 4c yellow brown ($10+)
1929 Scott 674 5c deep blue ($10+)
1929 Scott 675 6c red orange ($20+)
1929 Scott 676 7c black ($10+)
1929 Scott 677 8c olive green ($20+)
1929 Scott 678 9c light rose ($20+)
1929 Scott 679 10c yellow orange ($20+)
1918 Scott C1 6c orange ($30)
1918 Scott C2 16c green ($35)
1918 Scott C3 24c carmine rose & blue ($35)
1923 Scott C4 8c dark green ($10+)
1923 Scott C5 16c dark blue ($30)
1923 Scott C6 24c carmine ($30)
1933 Scott C18 50c green ($47+)
1913 Scott Q7 15c carmine rose ($10+)
1913 Scott Q8 20c carmine rose ($30)
1913 Scott Q10 50c carmine rose ($50)
1913 Scott Q11 75c carmine rose ($40)
1913 Scott Q12 $1 carmine rose ($45)
1913 Scott JQ2 2c dark green ($20)
1913 Scott JQ4 10c dark green ($47+)
1885 Scott E1 10c blue ($80)
1888 Scott E2 10c blue ($45)
1893 Scott E3 10c orange ($55)
1894 Scott E4 10c blue ($80)
1895 Scott E5 10c blue ($10+)
1902 Scott E6 10c ultramarine ($10)
1908 Scott E7 10c green ($50)
1911 Scott E8 10c ultramarine ($10)
1911 Scott F1 10c ultramarine ($10+)
1895-97 (Scott PR116) 5c black ($10+)
1895-97 (Scott PR117) 10c black ($10+)
1895-97 (Scott PR118) 25c carmine ($20)
1895-97 (Scott PR119) 50c carmine ($20+)
1919 Scott K1 2c on 1c green ($20+)
1919 Scott K2 4c on 2c rose, Type I ($20+)
1919 Scott K3 6c on 3c violet, Type II ($60)
1919 Scott K4 8c on 4c brown ($60)
1919 Scott K5 10c on 5c blue ($65)
1919 Scott K6 12c on 6c red orange ($85)
1919 Scott K7 14c on 7c black ($87+)
1919 (Scott K10) 20c on 10c orange yellow ($60)
1879 Scott J1 1c brown ($10+)
1879 Scott J2 2c brown ($20+)
1860 Scott U19 1c blue/buff ($10+)
1860 Scott U27 3c red/buff ($10+)
1864 Scott U56 2c black/orange ($10)
1870 Scott U76 1c blue/orange ($10+)
1870 Scott U86 6c dark red/amber ($20)
1871 Scott U88 7c vermilion/amber ($60)
1875 Scott U178 5c blue, die 2 ($10)
1876 Scott U218 3c red ($20+)
1876 (Scott U219) 3c green ($10+)
1886 Scott U293 2c green ($20)
1893 Scott U351 10c slate brown ($20+)
1903 Scott U390 4c chocolate ($10+)
1903 Scott U393 5c blue ($10+)
1934 Scott RW1$1 blue ($150)
1935 Scott RW2 $1 rose lake ($160)
1936 Scott RW3 $1 brown black ($90)
1937 Scott RW4 $1 light green ($70)
1938 Scott RW5 $1 light violet ($75)
1939 Scott RW6 $1 chocolate ($45)
1940 Scott RW7 $1 sepia ($45)
B) (    ) around a number indicates a blank space choice
C) *1870-71 Scott 134-136:These have grills
D) *1879 Scott 187 or 188: Without and with secret mark.
E) *1912-15: Choices are Perf 12 vs Perf 10
F) *1916-19: Unwmk; Choices are Perf 10 vs Perf 11
G) *1922-31: Choices are Perf 11 vs Perf 10 vs Perf 11 X 10 1/2
H) *1930-33 Postage Due: Choices Perf 11 vs Perf 11 X 10 1/2

1901 Scott 298 8c violet brown & black
"Canal Locks at Sault Ste. Marie"
Out of the Blue
Because of inherent interest and (frankly) major expense, the U.S. based collector is often satisfied with only collecting their own country, perhaps a bit of Canada as well. That is a shame, as there is the whole world to explore through stamps!

Note: Maps and image pics appear to be in the common domain.

Comments appreciated!

4 comments:

  1. Hi, Jim! Great post! I waited for it, and it's a real pleasure to read. I like especially your last remark, and I agree with it, but I must understand those who choose to collect only US, because the specialized catalogs offer them so much information. I admit that through all my non-European stamps, I like the most the ones from US, China, and Japan. However, indeed, the whole world worth be discovered through stamps! Catalin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Catalin

      Actually the United States blog post was quite challenging to me (and intimidating), as I realize the amount of specialization that is there and possible, and yet I had to stay with a general "USA 101" approach.

      Delete
  2. Very instructive Jim,thanks a lot.

    But how many pages does Big Blue have for the United States. Deep Blue has 91 pages you wrote but Big Blue?

    Axel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't say, did I ? ;-)

      For the '69 BB, It is 30 pages, including a page for the Confederate States.

      But I do not collect envelopes, or Hunting stamps, which reduces my active pages to 22 pages, plus a page for the Confederate States, which I handle separately.

      Delete