A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Cuba


1896 5c slate blue & 10c emerald
Proclaimed King at birth: Alfonso XIII
Quick History
Located south of Florida, the Island now know as Cuba originally became a Spanish possession when Christopher Columbus claimed the land in 1492. But after the Spanish-American War ended in 1898, Spain relinquished the Island. In 1902 a Republic was established. The Capital is Havana, and the population was 4,700,000 in 1943.

 Philatelic Portrait History: The 1890 Cuban Spanish possession stamp issues with a portrait of  King Alfonso XIII shows a "child". That is because he was! He was proclaimed King at his birth in 1886, with his mother Queen Maria Christina appointed regent. In 1902, at age 16, the King assumed control of the state.

1907 50c gray & black & 1910 50c violet & black
Maj. Gen. Antonio Maceo
Big Blue Picture
Big Blue '97, on nine pages, has 114 spaces between 1855-98 when Cuba was a Spanish possession, 6 spaces for 1898 when Cuba was under administration of the United States, and 114 stamp spaces for the Republic, for a total of 234 stamp spaces. The 2011 Scott Classic Specialized catalogue has 462 major stamp descriptions. Coverage by Big Blue is 50%.

Cuba gives one three different philatelic eras: the Spanish Possession stamps (1855-98), the U.S. Intervention stamps (1898-99), and the Republic stamps (1899-1940). Big Blue, for the most part, provides a nice selection. The stamps, save for the early surcharged 1898-99 U.S. Administration (Scott 176-220), are quite reasonable in price.

Unfortunately, the '69 editors hacked off a page of B.O.B. Cuba: Special Delivery (Six stamps), Air Post Special Delivery (one stamp), and Newspaper stamps (Nineteen stamps).

I did find about 70 additional stamps that the Big Blue collector could consider. Among them is a very interesting 1937 issue ( about 21 stamps) not found in Big Blue, The details are found under "Additionals".

Pitfalls putting the stamps into the album?
There are at least two...
A) In the 1878 issue spaces, Big Blue specifies for the 25c denomination, the color "deep green". In Scott's catalog, that is a minor number-79c(<$1). The major number in the Scott catalogue ( Even my '47 edition shows this) is the 79 "yellow green"(<$1). Alas, this demonstrates how some color specifications have not been updated in the album for well nigh 60+ years. So if you would like to be true to Big Blue, find the 79c "deep green" variety.  :-)  I include a picture in the blog of the two colors. BTW, I checked the "Big Brown" 19th Century album with copyright 1919, and they list the 25c as "green".

B) Some of the 1899 first issues (Scott 227-231) of the Republic under U.S. military rule- the 1c,2c,5c,& 10c,-were re-engraved in 1905 (Scott 233-237). See Scott for details. Suffice to say, the re-engraving differences are NOT subtle. Once you know, a glance will suffice. (I include a picture of the two 2c "Royal Palms" in the blog.)  Big Blue, as one would expect, only provides one space for the two varieties.
I would recommend putting the 1899 "original" issue in Big Blue, and have a separate space to put the re-engraved issue. Of interest, all of my Big Blues have had a mixture of original and re-engraved stamps in the spaces. Recently, I received a lot that included these stamps. They had been identified and labeled as the original issue,when they were clearly the re-engraved variety. Doesn't anybody look critically at stamps anymore?  ;-)  Just for fun, go through your stamps for these denominations, and identify the two varieties.

Additionals....
1856 Yellowish paper Imperf
9(<$1)

1862-64 Imperf
Choices not taken: 18(<$1) or 20($1+) or 21($5+)

1868 Dated "1868"
33($2+)

1866-67
Choices not taken: 26($5+) or 29($1+) or 30($5+)

1871 "Espana" seated
53($5+)

1878 dated "1878"
81($2+)

1883 (Issues of 1882 surcharged and overprinted)
Choices not taken

Type "c" illust One space: 112($1+) or113($2+) 
Type "d" illust One space: 115($1+) or 116($2+)
Type "e" illust One space: 118($1+) or 119($5+) 

1883-86 (types of 1882)
125,126,(<$1-$2+)

1898 "teen"  King Alfonso Xlll
164($2+),171,172,(<$1 eN)

Administration of the U.S.
1898-89 (Issues of Cuba 1898 & 1896 surcharged)
Scott 176-220 (44 stamps)
Note: Least expensive is Scott 178 @ $20+!

1899-07 (Issues of the Republic under U.S. military rule)
Choices not taken: 227 or 233*,228 or 234*,230 or 236*($1+),231 or 237* (<$1 eN)

1910 portraits
246($2+)

1911 portraits different color
252($1+)

1914 Map of Cuba
255,260,(<$1)

1917-28 Portraits
273(<$1)

1927
283($2+)

1928 Pictorials & Map
287,288,289,290,291,(<$1)
292,293,($2+)

1929 Capital, Havana
298($2+)

1936
330,331,($2+)
332*(<$1)
*Comment: The lovely and relevant still today 1936  Scott 332-336 issues "Peace and Work", "Maximo Gomez Monument","Torch",'Independence", and "Messenger of Peace" respectively, is missing 332 1c emerald "Peace and Work" in BB (20 cents!). The rest of the series is there. Now 332 is a rather large stamp, and apparently couldn't be squeezed into the layout. Here layout- and not for the first time- trumps philatelic series completeness and relevancy. I know economic realities, but that just frosts me. :-(

1937 Fifteen Pictorials/Portraits of different Pan-American Nations
340,341,342,343,(<$1)
344,345,346,347($2+),348,349,($1+ eN)
350($5+),351,352,353,354,($2+ eN)
Note: An interesting issue. Sold only for 3 days in 1937 with proceeds to the Association of American Writers. Not in Big Blue! Also see C24-C29 in "Additionals"

Postage Due
1899 (Under administration of U.S.)
J1,J2,J3,($5+)
J4($2+)

Air Post
1927-31
C3,C10,C11,($1+-<$1)

1937 Six Pictorials/Portraits of different Pan-American Nations
C24,C25,C26,C27,C28,C29,($5+)
Note: See relevant note in "Additionals" for the 1937 Pan-American Nations issue.

Note: See the Kinds of Blue section for additional Special Delivery and Newspaper stamps that are found in the '47 & '41 editions. Below are more "additionals" that could be considered by the Big Blue collector.

Special Delivery
1914-17  
E5 or E6(<$1)
Note: Choice not taken from '47/'41 editions

1935
E7(<$1)

Newspaper stamps
1888
P4,P5,($1+)

1892
P17,P18,($1+-$2+)

1894
P23,P24($1+-$2+)

1878 79c 25c deep green & 79 yellow green
King Alfonso XII
Big Blue specifies the deep green
Big Blue Checklist
Issued under Spanish Dominion

Note: Scott 1-3,9-14,17-21,32-34,35A-37,39-41,43-45,47-49,51-53,55-57 also used in Puerto Rico; Scott 2-3 also used in Philippines.

1855 Blue paper Imperf "Queen Isabella ll"
1* ($5+), 2 ($2+), 3 ($10+), 4 ($10+)
*Note: Scott 1 is 1/2r blue green; 1856 Scott 9 1/2r yellow green (<$1) with YELLOWISH paper excluded by BB-as is Scott 10,11- for both date and paper.

1857 white paper Imperf
12,13,14,(<$1-$2+)

1862-64 Imperf
16($10+),17($10+),19($1+)
Blank space: suggest 18(<$1) or 20($1+) or 21($5+)

1866-67
24,25,28,($1+)
Blank space: suggest 26($5+) or 29($1+) or 30($5+)
Note: 24-26 1866 Imperf; 28-30 1867 Perf dated "1867".

1868 dated "1868"
31($5+),32($1+),34($5+)

1860 dated "1869"
39,40,($1+-$2+)

1870 "Espana"
47,48,(<$1)

1871 "Espana" seated
50($10+),51,52*,(<$1 eN)
*Note 52 "green" in BB; "gray green" in Scott
eN=except noted

1873 King Amadeo
54($10+),55,56,(<$1 eN)

1874 "Espana" seated
58($5+),59,60,61,(<$1 eN)

1875 "Coat of Arms"
63,64,65,66($2+),(<$1 eN)

1876 King Alfonso Xll
67($1+),68,69,70($2+),(<$1 eN)

1877
72($2+),73,74,(<$1 eN)

1878 dated "1878"
76,78($1+),79c*,80, (<$1 eN)
*Note: BB specifies now minor number 79c "deep green"; 79 is "yellow green"
See discussion in the Big Blue Picture section.

1879 dated "1879"
82,84,85,86,(<$1)

1880
88,90,91,92,93($2+),(<$1 eN)

1881
94,96,97,(<$1)

1881(continued)
98,99,(<$1-$2+)

1882
100,101,102($1+),103,104, (<$1 eN)

1883 (Issues of 1882 surcharged and overprinted)
Big Blue:"Issues of 1882 with various surcharges"
Type "a" illust Two spaces: 106($1+) and/or 107($1+) and/or 108($20+)
Type "b" illust Two spaces: 109($1+) and/or 110($2+) and/or 111($40+)
Type "c" illust One space: 112($1+) or113($2+) or 114($30+)
Type "d" illust One space: 115($1+) or 116($2+) or 117($30+)
Type "e" illust One space: 118($1+) or 119($5+) or 120($50+)

1883-86 (types of 1882)
122,124,127,128($2+),(<$1 eN)

1888 (types of 1883-88)
129,130,131($2+), (<$1 eN)

1890 "child" King Alfonso Xlll
132($5+),136($2+),140*,144,147,150,(<$1 eN)
*Note: 140 is "emerald green" in BB: "emerald" in Scott.

1891 "child" King Alfonso Xlll
133($2+),137,141($10+),145*,148,151($5+),(<$1 eN)
*Note: 145 is "emerald green" in BB: "emerald" in Scott.

1894 "child" King Alfonso Xlll
134,142,152,(<$1)

1896 "child" King Alfonso Xlll
135,139,143,146,149*,(<$1)
*Note 149 is "emerald green" in BB: "emerald" in Scott.

1898 "teen"  King Alfonso Xlll
156,157,158,159($1+),160,161,162,(<$1 eN)
163,165,166,167,168,169,170,(<$1)

Administration of the U.S.
1899 (U.S. stamps overprinted/surcharged "Cuba")
221,222 or 222A,223 or 223A,224($1+),225($1+),226($5+) or 226A($10+),(<$1 eN)

Issues of the Republic
1902 surcharge
232(<$1)

1899-07 (Issues of the Republic under U.S. military rule)
227 or 233*,228 or 234*,229,230 or 236*($1+),231 or 237* (<$1 eN)
*Note: 227-231 1899 issues; 233-237 1905 re-engraved issues. BB illustrates the "original" 1899 issues, but  BB's dates (1899-07) allow the inclusion of the re-engraved issues, so I include them as choices.
See discussion in the Big Blue Picture section.

1907 Maj. Gen. Antonio Maceo
238(<$1)

1910 portraits
239,240,241,242,243,244,245*(<$1)
*Note: 245 is 50c violet & black, while 238 (1907) is gray blue & black.

1911 portraits different color
247,248,250,251,(<$1)

1914 Map of Cuba
253,254*,256,(<$1)
*Note: 254 2c carmine rose; BB excludes 255 red.

1914 (continued)
257,258,259*,(<$1)
*Note: 259 10c brown; BB excludes 260 olive green.

(1914) 
203 ($2+)

1917-28 Portraits
1c: 264 or 274 or 280($1+)(<$1 eN)
2c: 265 or 266 or 275 or 281($1+) (<$1 eN)
3c: 267
5c: 268 or 276 or 282($1+)(<$1 eN)
8c: 269 or 277(<$1)
10c: 270 or 278(<$1)
20c: 271 or 279($1+)
50c: 272(<$1)
Note: 264-273 1917-18 unwmk; 274-279 1925-28 wmk 106-star; 280-282 1926 Imperf.

1934 Dr. Finlay
319,320,(<$1-$1+)

1928 Pictorials & Map
284,285,286,(<$1)

1933 (type of 1917 overprinted)
317,318,(<$1)

1929 Capital, Havana
294,295*,296*,297,(<$1)
*Note: 295 "carmine red" in BB, "carmine rose" in Scott.
*Note: 296 "deep blue" in BB, "blue" in Scott

1930 Hurdler
299,300,301,302,303,(<$1)

1933
312,316($2+),313,314,315,(<$1 eN)

1936
324,325,326,327,(<$1)
328,329,322,323,(<$1)
333*,334,336($1+),335,(<$1 eN)
*Note: see my comment about the "included" 333-336 and the "missing" 332 in the BB Picture section.

1937
338,337,339,355($2+),(<$1 eN)

1939
356,357,358,(<$1)

1939
359,360,361,(<$1)

1940
362,363(<$1)
364,365,(<$1)

Semi-Postal stamps
1938
B1,B2,($1+)

Postage Due
1914
J5,J6,J7,($1+-$2+)

1918* (Actually 1927-28)
J8,J9,J10,(<$1-$1+)
*Note: A BB date printing error. The "rose reds", specified by BB, were issued in 1927-28.
Change date to "1928".

Air Post
1927-31
C1,C2,C4,C5*($1+-<$1)
C6,C7,(<$1)
Two spaces: suggest C8,C9(<$1)
*Note: C5 10c "blue" in BB; "dark blue" in Scott

1931-32
C12*,C13,C14*,C15, (<$1)
*Note: C12 5c "dull violet" in BB; "rose violet" in Scott
*Note; C14 20c "carmine rose"; C14A is "rose pink", a '46 issue, and not eligible for BB.

1936
C18,C19,C20($1+),C21($2+),(<$1 eN)

1938
C30($1+)

1936
C22,C23,($1+)

1939
C31($5+)

1940
C34,C32,C35,($1+)

Postal Tax stamps
1938-40
RA1,RA2,RA3,(<$1)

1899 Scott 228 2c carmine "Royal Palms" & 1905 re-engraved Scott 234 2c rose
The foliate ornaments inside the oval surrounding the "2" have been removed with re-engraving
Kinds of Blue
The '69 and '97 editions are identical in content.

Unfortunately, the '69 editors dropped Special Delivery (Six stamps), Air Post Special Delivery (one stamp), and Newspaper stamps (Nineteen stamps). The specifics...

Special Delivery ( In '47 & '41)
1899
E2($10+)

1902
E3($1+)

1910
E4($2+)

1914-17
E5 or E6 (<$1-$1+)

Air Post Special Delivery (In '47 & '41)
1936
CE1($2+)

Newspaper stamps (In '47 & '41)
1888
P1,P2,P3,(<$1)

1890
P7,P8,P9,P10($1+),(<$1 eN)

1892
P13,P14,P15,P16,(<$1)

1894
P19,P20,P21,P22($1+),(<$1 eN)

1896
P25,P26,P27,P28($1+),(<$1 eN)

The '47, though, is missing Three Postage Dues.
What the '47 and '41 editions have printed:
1914-28
Illustration; 2c rose red, 5c rose red

The "rose reds" (J8-J10) were the 1927-28 issue. That eliminates the 1914 issue which is "carmine rose"
So "missing" in the '47 and '41 are:
1914 (In '69 & '97)
J5,J6,J7,($1+-$2+)

The "47 and "41, in the 1864 issue has a specified space: "1r p Blue on Salmon", which is Scott 20($1+). The '69 and '97 instead have a blank space which allows these choices: suggest 18(<$1) or 20($1+) or 21($5+).

1899 Scott 223 2 1/2 c on 2c reddish carmine type III
Big Blue Bottom Line
Classical Cuba provides one with three historical philatelic Eras.  Buenisima!

If you enjoyed this post, or have some information to share, or have some constructive criticism, please share your thoughts and reactions in the "comment" section.  Thanks!

Note: You will need to consult a Scott catalogue for specific pricing. I only give a very "ball park" price, and never the actual catalogue value.
<$1= less than a Dollar
$1+= more than a Dollar
$2+= more than two Dollars
$5+= more than five Dollars
$10+= more than ten Dollars
$20+..and so on.

2 comments:

  1. Re, proper identification of stamps...

    I think all collectors do make mistakes when trying to identify fine level of details. Some of it may be pure ignorance / laziness, but more often I fear it's just lack of proper education (guilty as charged). I've used a lot of time in recent years to "re-check" areas I had build as a "novice collector". And boy, I can only laugh aloud how silly identification mistakes I've made back then. And likely I'll be laughing to myself in 10 years time as well. LOL.

    Who knows, maybe all these wrongly identified stamps make collecting more engaging? After all, what fun would it be if all the stamps were properly identified first place. It's much more exiting to have ups and downs :)

    just my 2 cents worth,
    -keijo-

    ReplyDelete
  2. Point well taken. I am definitely on my own (early) learning curve. :-)

    And Big Blue, as part of its legacy as a "Junior collection", positively invites collectors to ignore perforations,watermarks and so forth.

    Nothing wrong with that in a sense, as that does telescope stamp spaces to a basic level.

    And it is fun to investigate a Big Blue acquisition to determine what treasures are hidden in the spaces.

    ReplyDelete