A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered by the blog author, Jim Jackson, with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Friday, June 3, 2011

Central Lithuania

1921 Scott 2  25f dark green"Coat of Arms"
Quick History
Central Lithuania, with the Capital Vilnius, was located east of Lithuania and north of Poland. Originally a Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the territory came under Russian rule by the end of the 18th Century. After WWI, Lithuania claimed the territory, but the Polish army under General Zeligowski occupied the land from 1920-22. During this time, the stamp issues were produced, and the General appears on Scott 26, 57, & 58. Subsequently, the territory became part of Poland.

Big Blue Picture
Big Blue '97, on three pages, has 43 spaces for regular, semi-postal, and postage due stamps. The 2011 Scott Classic Specialized catalogue has 53 major descriptions. Coverage by Big Blue is 81%.

Coverage by Big Blue, based on the 2011 catalogue, is magnificent; only missing the Scott 13-22 1920 surcharged Lithuanian 1919 stamp issue. This stamp issue is expensive (cheapest $20+), so a good decision by BB.

But there is a curve ball.

ALL of the issues in BB also exist as Imperforate- so DOUBLE the possibilities. In fact, the '41 and '47 editions DO provide room for the Imperforates too. The '69 and '97 editions have cut out these extra spaces. So a bad choice by BB?

Not necessarily.

Scott has collapsed in their catalogue all the separate Scott numbers for the Imperfs, using the same Scott number as the perforated variety. When they did that, I don't know. The '47 Scott catalogue has all these extra numbers for Imperfs, while the 2011 catalogue does not. So the same Scott number - and space - is shared now for both the Perf and Imperf varieties. Fair enough. The '69 and '97 editions follow the "modern" Scott catalogue.

Still, that leaves the '69 and '97 BB collector with a dilemma. Does one mix and match the perforated and imperforated varieties together? After all, they share the same Scott number. Or does one find separate room for the two varieties?  With the spacious '97, I plan to have a Perf group and an Imperf group for each series.

1920 Scott 23 25f gray "Lithuanian Girl"
Big Blue Checklist
Note: All issues exist as Perf & Imperf
1920 "Coat of Arms"
1,3,5,2,4,6,(<$1)

(1920) Pictorials
23,24,25,26,27($1+),28($2+), (<$1 except noted)

(1921) Pictorials
35,37,39, (<$1)
36,38,40,41($1+),42($1+), (<$1 except noted)

1921-22 Pictorials
54,53,56,55,($5+)
57,58,($2+)

Semi-postal stamps
1921 surcharged: For plebiscite in Upper Selisia
B1,B2,B3,B4,B5,B6,(<$1-$1+)

(1921 surcharged)
B13,B14,($2+)
B17,B18,B19, (<$1)

Postage Due
1920-21
J1,J2,J4,J5,J3,(<$1)
J6($2+)

The Imperforated variety: 1921 Scott 35 1m dark gray & yellow "St. Anne's Church,Vilnius"
Kinds of Blue
The '69 and '97 editions are identical.
The '47 and '41 editions have twice the spaces (86 rather than 43), as they provide room for both the Perf and Imperf varieties of each stamp. But the "modern" Scott catalogue (2011 and earlier?) has collapsed the two separate Scott numbers for each variety into one Scott number. So each stamp design only "deserves" one space  in BB. The reality, of course is this: One will choose to only put perforated (or imperforated) stamps in the Album; or mix and match the two varieties with the spaces provided; or find extra space in the Album or elsewhere to separate them out.  Your choice.

Big Blue Bottom Line
I've mentioned nothing about the designs and pictorials: They are quite attractive. I will enjoy filling these spaces. Now where will I put the Imperfs?  :-)

Note: You will need to consult a Scott catalogue for specific pricing. I only give a very "ball park" price, and never the actual catalogue value.
<$1= less than a Dollar
$1+= more than a Dollar
$2+= more than two Dollars
$5+= more than five Dollars
$10+= more than ten Dollars
$20+..and so on.

2 comments:

  1. You list only 40 stamps for BB; did you mean to also list 35, 37, and 39

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good catch Gyrfalcon - appreciate it!

      35,37,39, are now listed in the checklist which then accounts for all 43 spaces in the '69 BB.

      Delete